Correcting my Blitz Work by Fynn

Posted in Writing we do at school, WW2

I will never forget that day when I and my family were sitting on the couch and silently listening to the radio for a sign of war. Suddenly the air raid siren boomed at a volume louder than ever before and that’s all I heard for a short amount of time until everyone started running outside and into their shelters. For a week or two we all sat in hunger and the smell of smoke. Finally, what we were all hoping for, the all clear siren boomed, even know it was one of the most horrible noises I have ever heard it was the best thing that had happened to me in those past few weeks.

When we had all scrambled out of the Anderson shelter, into the open air, we turned around to what looked like a city that had been hit by a hurricane! It was like my worst nightmare was staring at me, face to face, all of my and my family’s belongs, all black and in pieces smothered over the pile of wreckage that once was my house. Then I walked round the side of the wreck and I saw a bus leaning up against it and huge crater next to it, one of the bombs must have landed next to the bus and sent it flying and here’s where it landed.

Adding some more and correcting it

I will never forget that day, when my family and I were sitting on the couch, silently listening to the radio for a sign of war. Suddenly, the air raid siren boomed at a volume louder than ever before. That’s all I heard for a short amount of time until everyone started running outside and into their shelters. For a week or two we all sat in hunger and the smell of smoke! Finally, what we were all hoping for, the all clear siren, boomed, even though it was one of the most horrible noises I have ever heard, it was the best thing that had happened to me in those past few weeks.

When we had all scrambled out of the Anderson shelter, into the open air, we turned around to what looked like a city that had been hit by a hurricane! It was like my worst nightmare was staring at me, face to face, all of mine and my family’s belongs, all black and in pieces, smothered the pile of wreckage that once was my house. Then I walked round the side of the wreck and I saw a bus leaning up against it and a huge crater next to it. One of the bombs must have landed next to the bus and sent it flying and here’s where it had landed. There were men, women and children searching frantically through the smoldering debris for signs of lost loved ones and treasured possessions. Their faces darkened and distorted by soot, blood and tears.

I stumbled over the carnage to see if I could be of any assistance to the ARP wardens. I thought I could hear a crying noise coming from behind the remains of the bus. As quickly as I could, I sprinted over to where the sound was coming from. To my joy I found a little girl huddled up against the crumbled wall of my house. She was terrified but eagerly took my outstretched hand and I led her, limping and whimpering over to one of the ARP’s. In my darkest of days, her eyes, sparkling with gratitude, filled my heart with hope.

Image result for blitz

 

 

 

The Blitz by Fynn

Posted in Writing we do at school, WW2

I will never forget that day when I and my family were sitting on the couch and silently listening to the radio for a sign of war. Suddenly the air raid siren boomed at a volume louder than ever before and that’s all I heard for a short amount of time until everyone started running outside and into their shelters. For a week or two we all sat in hunger and the smell of smoke. Finally, what we were all hoping for, the all clear siren boomed, even know it was one of the most horrible noises I have ever heard it was the best thing that had happened to me in those past few weeks.

When we had all scrambled out of the Anderson shelter, into the open air, we turned around to what looked like a city that had been hit by a hurricane! It was like my worst nightmare was staring at me, face to face, all of my and my family’s belongs, all black and in pieces smothered over the pile of wreckage that once was my house. Then I walked round the side of the wreck and I saw a bus leaning up against it and huge crater next to it, one of the bombs must have landed next to the bus and sent it flying and here’s where it landed.

Poem About the Blitz by Fynn

Posted in Poetry, Writing we do at school, WW2

Sirens boom,

People scatter,

Fear spreads,

The city of London is under siege,

The hell of Hitler is upon us.

Incendiary bombs rain flames,

A murderous inferno sets the city alight,

Fearless firemen fight,

Smouldering ruins lye,

A choking dawn is ahead of us.

And our capital is now a pile of skeletal remains.

Image result for london blitz

Fynn’s World War 2 Cakes

Posted in Writing we do at home

Chocolate Oat Cakes

  • 2 oz. (56g) margarine
  • 2 oz. (56g) sugar
  • 8 oz. (225g) self-raising flour (if using plain add 2 teaspoons of baking powder)
  • 1 breakfast cup (95g) of rolled oats
  • pinch salt
  • 1.5 oz. (42g) of cocoa powder
  • milk and water

Method

  1. Rub the margarine into the flour
  2. Add the rolled oats, sugar, pinch of salt and cocoa powder
  3. Mix well and add a little milk and water to moisten and stick the mixture together
  4. Roll into balls and press down until very thin with the back of a fork or alternatively roll out until thin, cut into rounds and prick all over with a fork
  5. Bake in an oven at 190C (380F) for about 15 minutes until golden brown.
  6. Sprinkle with sugar and cool on a wire rackhomework (cake)

Frank Wild’s Diary Entry by Fynn

Posted in Frozen, Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure, Writing we do at school

October 27th

Frank wild

 

It’s time to abandon ship; the ice has taken over and is shattering windows, twisting and crushing timber. Now it’s time to set up camp on the ice. We’ve made a huge tarpaulin slide for the dogs to run and slide down. Hurley has to smash most of his pictures because we cannot carry them all, we just need to carry the things we need to survive like clothes and emergency life boats just in case the ice brakes if that happens we can row to an island with more animals like elephant  island.

Our hope of survival is low, all we eat now is meat; penguin, seal and whale blubber soon we are going to have to eat the dogs! That will be sad and frustrating because we will have to pull the entire luggage ourselves.

All we care about is survival; forget walking to the South Pole it’s too much to handle we just need to get on our life boats and leave this horrid, dark frozen place.

The Impossible Life Of An Emperor Penguin by Fynn

Posted in Frozen, Non-chronological reports, Writing we do at school

The impossible life of an emperor penguin

Emperor penguins are the largest in 17 species of penguin. They have grey and black feathers and an orange and black beak. Their height goes up to 1.3m and their weight is up to 40kg’s.Their easily recognised because they’ve got a bright orange line round their head.

They’re one of the only land animals that can stand the freezing climate all year round. All penguins live below the equator. They spend half the year in the sea and half on land.

They huddle to sustain warmth in the hardest winters. They can dive about 500 meters and that’s ok because they can hold their breath for up to 15 minutes. Their thick blubber keeps them warm in and out of the water. For 3months the father keeps food in his belly for the baby.

Both females and males have to walk 70miles to their breading ground. They meet at a specific place because most their predators live at the sea and the ice is thicker, so the eggs can’t fall through. For more than two months the male keeps the egg enclosed in a flap of blubber and feathers. If the egg roll out and dies they try to steal each other’s eggs.

The emperor penguin has an extremely aquatic diet. It’s easy to hunt for a penguin because these torpedo-like birds shoot through the water using their wings as flippers. They feed on fish, krill and squid.

There are 45 known colonies of the emperor penguin on the planet but the population will go down because of global warming.

Iceberg Poem by Fynn

Posted in Frozen, Poetry, Writing we do at school

Ice sheets shifting down an enormous slope towards the briny deep

 

Carving through the mountains of Greenland

 

Extremely large Pease’s of ice slipping near the seaway

 

Bulky chunks of ice slowly sliding of a large shelf made of isolated water

 

Extraordinary explosions of ice tumbling into the water

 

Rocket forces of ice zooming into the air, splashing down into the sapphire of the sea, forming a titanic iceberg

 

Gargantuan icebergs bobbing on the beauty of the ocean

 

 

 

 

The Emperor Penguin by Fynn

Posted in Frozen, Writing we do at school

 

The impossible life of an emperor penguin

Emperor penguins are the largest in 17 species of penguin. They have grey and black feathers and an orange and black beak. Their height goes up to 1.3m and their weight is up to 40kg’s.Their easily recognised because they’ve got a bright orange line round their head.

They’re one of the only land animals that can stand the freezing climate all year round. All penguins live below the equator. They spend half the year in the sea and half on land.

They huddle to sustain warmth in the hardest winters. They can dive about 500 meters and that’s ok because they can hold their breath for up to 15 minutes. Their thick blubber keeps them warm in and out of the water. For 3months the father keeps food in his belly for the baby.

Both females and males have to walk 70miles to their breading ground. They meet at a specific place because most their predators live at the sea and the ice is thicker, so the eggs can’t fall through. For more than two months the male keeps the egg enclosed in a flap of blubber and feathers. If the egg roll out and dies they try to steal each other’s eggs.

The emperor penguin has an extremely aquatic diet. It’s easy to hunt for a penguin because these torpedo-like birds shoot through the water using their wings as flippers. They feed on fish, krill and squid.

There are 45 known colonies of the emperor penguin on the planet but the population will go down because of global warming.Image result for the emperor penguin

 

Exciting Everest

Posted in Frozen, Writing we do at home

 

  1. It is over 60 million years old.
  2. It is 8848 meters high.
  3. The wind can blow over 200 MPH.
  4. The temperature can be -80F.
  5. It consists of different types of shale, limestone and marble.
  6. Temperatures can reach 100F in the west.
  7. Everest grows by about a quarter of an inch every year.
  8. Everest is called Chomolungma in Tibet, it means goddess of the universe.
  9. In 1865 it was named Mount Everest, after Sir George Everest.
  10. The summit measured at 29,035 feet in 1999.

 

Reference:

www.alanarnette.com/kids/everestfacts.php

by Fynn   30.9.16Image result for mount everest

 

 

ICEBERG by Fynn

Posted in Writing we do at school

Ice sheets shifting down an enormous slope towards the briny deep

 

Carving through the mountains of Greenland

 

Extremely large Pease’s of ice slipping near the seaway

 

Bulky chunks of ice slowly sliding of a large shelf made of isolated water

 

Extraordinary explosions of ice tumbling into the water

 

Rocket forces of ice zooming into the air, splashing down into the sapphire of the sea, forming a titanic iceberg

 

Gargantuan icebergs bobbing on the beauty of the ocean